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Bmo
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2007 8:27 am   Reply with quoteBack to top

I have no idea what a major or minor root is root, I cannot read music.
I have found a couple of videos on You-Tube for learning .I need more !
Is there any good DVD's out there that teach, not so much cords, but lead.Been playing acoustic most my life by winging it.Got short fat fingers but can pick pretty good.
Telling me what string to pick is no good right now, I need to see it as they play it. Hopefully over time I learn enough to just being told how to do it.
The SC 90 I bought is a real joy for me . I find myself playing for hrs and never tireing.String access, for my short fat fingers is no problem, although I can't stretch 5 frets. Even my wife of 33 years thinks I sound realy good with the SC 90. Before she wasn't so supportive ! Now that she has my confidence up, I need to build on it.
Thanks
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surfnorthwest
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2007 8:34 am   Reply with quoteBack to top

Metal Method by Doug Marks has some great stuff, but then again you don't need no stinkin lessons, just pratice baby!

I can highly recommned the DVD below to start playing lead

Guitar Licks

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Kobidog
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2007 10:29 am   Reply with quoteBack to top

practice, and practice is the best way. But just sitting down with other guitar players is a good way to learn. I have been playing from the age of 11 and am 53 now. I still learn more from playing with other guitar players, no matter how good or bad they are.


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Kobidog
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2007 10:37 am   Reply with quoteBack to top

If you get the chance to buy the Pink Floyd DVD "PULSE". Get it every lead lick that David Gilmore plays is a close up and very good to watch. Besides is a good DVD to just have.

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Rick500
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2007 12:44 pm   Reply with quoteBack to top

Check amazon.com for "Fretboard Logic"... Vol. 1 & 2 are one book, and vol. 3 is a second book. Just excellent.

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Eric 666
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2007 12:47 pm   Reply with quoteBack to top

Get John Petrucci's Rock Discipline DVD, I've seen it and it's one of the best DVD's ever.

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Bundy
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2007 1:10 pm   Reply with quoteBack to top

Kobidog wrote:
I still learn more from playing with other guitar players, no matter how good or bad they are.


Words I most definitely live by. Cool

Bmo, what is it specifically that you want to learn? Hop on over to the Tips & Techniques Forum and ask questions! Y'know, with all these musicians hanging out here, there should be no reason why someone can't learn from the CMBBS! Wink

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Bmo
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2007 7:57 pm   Reply with quoteBack to top

Thanks for all the responses.
I would like to have a visual instruction video just to simply learn what everyone is talking about. When I see "1234" I haven't a clue.
I like just about all kinds of music. Grew up in Bakersfield hearing only Country and Western, Joined the Service in 1971 and was interduced to R&R. This is my 1st love in music.Today I'd rather listen to music only, with little or no vocals.
I have plenty of time to learn as I no longer work, just want to be sure to head in the right direction.
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BluesPicker
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2007 6:10 am   Reply with quoteBack to top

Hey, Bmo, I know of which you speak. I'll be 58 next month, been hammering at this guitar playing thing for 40-something years, and still can't read music. I was going to say I've never taken a lesson in my life, but, honestly, school is in session every time you play on your guitar, jam with some buddies, check out other guitar players in their bands locally or see the big dogs in concert, watch a DVD, listen to music.

Learning music theory isn't a bad thing, but I've met other guys who cannot improvise off the printed page. If they lose their place on the page, or you go off in the moment, they're lost. They have no individual style. But I also know some very talented guys -- one is an excellent keyboard guy, Berkley trained -- who is as amazing on a jazz or blues jam as he is playing Tocata.

I've directed some large choirs and managed to translate what was in my head into parts and performance with a mix of musically trained and untrained folks (22 people in one contemporary choir). I learned as much from them as they learned from me.

Finally, it's never too late to fine tune things. My uncle played professionally all his adult life, and even after decades of playing the guitar, he'd take a few sessions with a teacher he knew, to learn some new chordings and things. I'm thinking of going in to at least try to make sense of all those dots, and squiggles and lines on a music sheet! We'll see ...
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Brian D
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2007 10:07 am   Reply with quoteBack to top

Frank Gambale instructional DVDs are good. He doesn't show you how to shred, he shows you how to play. It is up to you to take that knowledge and go forward.

Frank shows you the fretboard, strings, and how to correctly pick so you are moving your picking hand less. He does everything very slowly with extreme close up. You will learn the scales and how they are used. You will learn the modes and how they are used.

You can get these DVDs on amazon or at Frank's site. Gambale is the head guitar instructor at the Musician Institute in Los Angeles so he has the credentials to instruct.

http://www.frankgambale.com/books.php

Don't let the titles fool you, his instruction videos/DVD are very down to earth with the beginner/intermediate player in mind.

Good luck.

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RyanF
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2007 10:30 am   Reply with quoteBack to top

Rick500 wrote:
Check amazon.com for "Fretboard Logic"... Vol. 1 & 2 are one book, and vol. 3 is a second book. Just excellent.

+100

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Bmo
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2007 12:38 pm   Reply with quoteBack to top

Frank Gamble& Marks ,thats what i'm looking for.
Although I'd love to sit in with other guitarist and learn, thats just not going to happen right now, I realy don't know any.
I have created habits over the past 40 years that I can't seem to break. I do learn new ones where I can find them. It's just a good video, I believe, will help me understand, cause I have no musical training or knowledge.
Thanks
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Fingers
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2007 1:36 pm   Reply with quoteBack to top

As for knowing other guitarist, go down to your local rec department and see if they offer evening classes - you can learn and meet other musicians at the same time.

I agree with what everybody has said, but it really boils down to how serious you want to be. Do you want to have fun and sound good enough to sit around a camp fire with your guitar, or do you want to be more serious about it. If it is the latter, learn everything you can about your instrument and music in general. Watching people is great, but understanding what you are doing (for instance what key or mode you are playing in) really helps because if and when you do sit down to play with others and they say let's do a i-iv-v progression in A-minor (I don't even remember if that is a correct notation!) you'll know what he/she is saying and what chords or scale to play.

I learned a lot of music theory years ago, but what helped my guitar playing, specifically leads, was sticking in a CD and playing along with David Gilmore, Rush, and eventially Satriani and Vai. Then you can take all those different influences and the different things you learned from each and throw it in the back of your mind to draw upon for your own music style.

What ever you do, keep it fun for yourself.
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mghtx
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2007 9:42 pm   Reply with quoteBack to top

Get those book and CD combos that have the songs with and without the guitar parts. Those are fantastic.

And I'll also say that playing with others or just going to the local club is great. Even Hendrix always wanted to jam with others.

Quote:
If you get the chance to buy the Pink Floyd DVD "PULSE". Get it every lead lick that David Gilmore plays is a close up and very good to watch. Besides is a good DVD to just have.


YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Applause Mr. Green

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jfine
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2007 2:48 am   Reply with quoteBack to top

Bmo--the numbers refer to how notes or chords function within a key. For instance, a 1st position C chord cosists of C (5th string, third fret), E (4th string, second fret), G (third string, open), C (second string, first fret), and E (first string, open). That's only three different note names in a five-note chord, and a C chord cosists of C (root), E (major 3rd, generally abbreviated to just "3rd"), and G (5th). So our C chord can be described as (low to high) 1-3-5-1-3, with the last two an octave higher than the first two. To make the chord minor, the 3rd gets flatted (down one half step, or one fret, so a C minor would be C-Eb-G. Chords in a progression can be numbered the same way--the ever-popular "La Bamba" is 1-4-5, or C-F-G in the key of C, A-D-E in the key of A, etc. It's all based on the major scale, good ol' do-re-mi-fa-so-la-ti-do, or 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-octave (1). A chord or interval (the space between notes) is assumed to be major unless specified otherwise, the exception being 7th chords, which have a flatted 7th (C7=C-E-G-Bb). The chord consisting of C-E-G-B is called C major 7, usually abbreviated as C Ma7. They're both useful, but they're both very different--play one, then the other and you'll hear the difference immediately. "Smoke On The Water" can be written as 1-b3-4, 1-b3-b5-4, 1-b3-4, b3-1...or in the key of E, E-G-A, E-G-Bb-A, E-G-A,G-E. Hope I haven't confused you too much...
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truedog
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2007 9:07 am   Reply with quoteBack to top

I began playing 34 years ago as a seventh grader, taking lessons, etc after a few years of forced piano lessons. I have had preiods of time with no guitar for a few years at a time, other periods playing bass in garage bands, etc.

When I ordered my Carvin, part of my motivation was to make myself get back into playing with more devotion.

I purchased the Dougs Marks course as well as his Metal Licks DVD, and have been working on them every day since I placed the order for my new guitar. The first two DVD's of his basic course are really beginner oriented and quite good. I skimmed through them for review and beginning with stage three I am actually working the course.

I have also started learning the licks on the Metal Licks DVD, playing my old acoustic Alvarez AE, repeating one or two licks endlessly each week (driving my wife and daughter nuts) until I can play them mostly error free.

In the last four weeks my playing has shown a marked improvement, and will hopefully continue to improve once my new guitar arrives, and with continued hard work and practice.

I do need to find someone local to jam with ocassionally, which would also help, but I would recommend the Doug Marks DVD's to ANYONE (including complete beginners) looking to improve their playing.
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tambokgt
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 19, 2007 7:26 pm   Reply with quoteBack to top

...same boat .... would like to learn how to read music....licks are nice...but after that...whats next? you get tired of it. Would like to learn how to read and learn jazz guitar.

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AlienQuiksilver
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PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2007 4:28 am   Reply with quoteBack to top

tambokgt wrote:
...same boat .... would like to learn how to read music....licks are nice...but after that...whats next? you get tired of it. Would like to learn how to read and learn jazz guitar.


It's nice always having somewhere to go, eh Phillip? Imagine where we'll all be 20 years from now. I can tell that most of us love music/guitar enough to just keep on learnin!

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Tonys300ad
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:36 pm   Reply with quoteBack to top

Check out some of the DVD's from Rock House Method. They have some great stuff and thier website has alot of good people there to help out those who want to learn. You get free membership to the site if you own one of thier products. I have one of thier DVD's (Hands of Steel) It is a great workout DVD. They have a bunch of others as well. Everyone there is willing to help each other out. They even have a share section to post some of your stuff (origionals) Great bunch of people there. Like one big family!
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