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 Pickup selector switch stuck. Fix? View next topic
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eudaimonia
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 7:15 am   Reply with quoteBack to top

Hey fellas. The pickup selector switch on my Schecter Elite Diamond 7 guitar is broken. It has a spring inside of it that makes it snap between settings. Right now, it won't stay on the neck position setting, but snaps to the middle position. Sometimes it won't stay on the bridge position either.

I assume I'll just have to replace the entire switch (which means buying a soldering iron, etc.). But does anyone know if you can fix these things some other way? The switch is encased in a plastic box. It doesn't look like I'll be able to get inside of it.

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sirmyghin
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 8:43 am   Reply with quoteBack to top

could always make said box open if you are overly opposed to rewiring, chisel might cut it. Sounds like your spring may have fallen out of track and wedged in sideways or something.
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wickid
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 9:38 am   Reply with quoteBack to top

eudaimonia wrote:
...(which means buying a soldering iron, etc.). ...

No time like the present. Every guitar player should have 1.
My opinion, it would be much easier to hook up a new switch than try and break open and repair the old one. I also suggest desoldering wick (copper braid) to help reomve the old solder - makes the job of disconnecting/reconnecting easier. Probably wont need to clip/strip the old wire leads. You put the wick betwen the iron and the soldering spot, and it soaks up the solder.

edit - \/ Also agree with PEB.


Last edited by wickid on Mon Sep 17, 2007 9:53 am; edited 1 time in total
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peb
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 9:42 am   Reply with quoteBack to top


I think replacing it will be your best option. First, I think you're going to end up destrying the switch just to get to the piece that broke and second, it's likely that whatever repair you could make would just be temporary as whatever caused it to fail initially is likely to reoccur.

Probably not the answer you wanted to hear but I think it'll give you much less frustration than trying to repair the switch, assuming you can even get to the piece that broke.

[edit] + 1 on the solder wick - makes desoldering much easier and cleaner. I might also suggest buying some alligator clips, or jumper wires with alligator clips on them to use as heat sinks. Too much heat on small wires tends to make the insulation shrink back.

peb

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SirFreakOfTheInk
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 10:13 am   Reply with quoteBack to top

Quote:
No time like the present. Every guitar player should have 1.


Definitely. It'll save time and money in the long run, and IMO doing a repair yourself is a rewarding experience.

You may already know this, but try to find a soldering iron with a low wattage rating. Those 100 watt ones are good for soldering copper pipe, but you'd have to move really fast to avoid damaging a guitar's electronics. Someone correct me if I'm wrong on this... I think 25 watts would be the maximum rating for use with instruments.
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peb
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 10:31 am   Reply with quoteBack to top


I use one I bought at Radio Shack that's switchable 15/30 watt. Can't remember for sure but I think it was $15 - $18.

peb

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eudaimonia
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 11:07 am   Reply with quoteBack to top

Thanks, guys. I figured I'd have to go the soldering route. So, there's my weekend project. (I'm guessing it will take me only a few minutes to do it, but buying supplies will take longer.) I haven't touched a soldering iron in 7 years or so.

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tbonesullivan
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 1:30 pm   Reply with quoteBack to top

I'd have to agree with other people here: just replace the switch. It'll most likely cause less problems in the long run, and you also should be able to find a more robust switch as a replacement.

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