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 how loud is too loud/mastering and mixing View next topic
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phalanges
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 12:55 pm   Reply with quoteBack to top

Well, you're right. Any CD today is compressed like crazy and made loud as can be. Listen to a CD from 20 years ago and compare it to a contemporary. My old CDs sound quiet by comparison. If yours doesn't sound like a recent release, you might actually be on the right track to good dynamics.

Incidentally, I recently discovered the use of a high pass filter on tracks with lower frequencies, to clean up some of the mud. As a result, I've done my cleanest recording yet. At least it suggests forward progress Laughing

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mghtx
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 3:41 pm   Reply with quoteBack to top

Go listen to Vapor Trails by RUSH. That's too loud. The CD was mastered way too hot and, in my opinion, ruined a great CD.

I once ripped some tunes off my Zeppelin How The West Was Won CD to make a mix CD. When I opened the songs in my program the level peaks were cut off (top and bottom). I couldn't even compress it to work with it.

You want it loud without being.....LOUD!!!!!!! Mr. Green I use a limiter to keep the levels within range without having cut-offs. And I use it lightly.

I'd rather be a little under than over.

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jca78
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 9:35 pm   Reply with quoteBack to top

+1 on the 2 above. i also dont try to drive my pre too hard to get distortion or soft clipping al-ah older tape recordings. i tend to stick with the sig i put in the track and not eq it to death or use compression too much. mghtx i use a limiter as well but a very soft rev, slow attack.
phalanges, yup seems every year cd's get louder but at what cost...

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jca78
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 16, 2009 3:39 pm   Reply with quoteBack to top

i picked up the new pumpkins album the other day for my wife and with it was a short dvd on how the album came together. it would seem they used the same studder reel that made the mellon and saddness album then mastered it digital. the sound is pretty good. you can tell the "sound" of the reel helped shaped the tone of the album and the compression wasnt over the top but still loud. dynamics are quite good. made me want to try to record something....look in music section.

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CK
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 03, 2009 12:05 am   Reply with quoteBack to top

Just briefly skimmed the previous posts, but thought I should add my 2 cents (apologies if someone mentioned this and I missed it):

Anytime you record with digital (which is used by the vast majority of us), your best bet is to have your record levels as loud as possible. Not monitor levels, main bus levels, etc., but specifically the recording level of each track (but not peaking, of course). The reason for this is, your sound must have the maximum dynamic range to use the maximum bit depth! What this means is that if I'm recording in 24 bit, I need to have my average level as loud as possible without peaking if I hope to make use of all of those bits. Lower level signals don't use the full bit depth. If my signal never peaked above -10, let's say, I might only be using 16 of my 24 bits. Less bits equals less information being encoded (i.e. less defined sound). I have some other comments about recording, but I may just start another thread about it. Hope this helps someone....
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jca78
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 03, 2009 6:09 pm   Reply with quoteBack to top

you are correct, really the question was about the mixdown and more to the point of mastering too loud or actual mastering levels. even when i was on a 22-4 i was trying to get my actual track levels as high as possible with out bumping the red too much. pretty much standard on track channels and not the issue.
it just seems most record today are mastered LOUD and in some cases their dynamic quality is very one sided. in other words their isnt a place for a musical peak just a valley, a reduction and thus less dynamic range. no room left. think of NiN (one i can think of at the moment) and his use of dynamics. i was trying to get a feel on where everyone masters their recordings. where do you master at? thanks for the post!!

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